cyberbullying research center   "October 9, 2006 my 17-year old niece, Rachael Neblett, took her own life after being bullied and stalked on MySpace. Six months after her death, Rachael's close friend, Kristin Settles, also committed suicide from depression. So, in an indirect way the bully cause two teenage deaths and destroyed two families. The families, along with community members in Mt Washington, KY have created a non-profit organization to spread awareness of cyber bulling and suicide. Our website is www.makeadifferenceforkids.org" (Father of 17 year-old girl from Mt. Washington, KY)
...identifying the causes and consequences of cyberbullying
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Dealing with Cyberbullying
1.
Which of the following can be considered "cyberbullying"?
A. Sending harassing text messages
B. Creating mean web sites
C. Posting embarrassing pictures of someone else online without their permission
D. Threatening someone on Facebook
E. All of the above

2.
A person can do the following when he or she is being bullied online:
A. Sign off from or leave the chatroom or instant message conversation
B. Block the bully's messages
C. Ignore the bully
D. Tell an adult
E. All of the above

3.
How can you find out if there is any personal information about you on the Internet?
A. Ask a stranger
B. Ask your parents
C. Google yourself
D. Call the police
E. You can't find out, it is impossible

4.
You should call the police if which of the following happens to you online:
A. Someone threatens your safety
B. Someone threatens your family's safety
C. Someone tries to set up a face-to-face meeting with you
D. Someone pressures you to do something illegal
E. All of the above

5.
Which of the following is the best way to protect your personal information while online?
A. Set your MySpace and Facebook page to "private"
B. Only tell your friends your passwords
C. Don't ever put any personal information online
D. Only post private information on web sites that you trust
E. All of the above

6.
A person can do the following when he or she feels like bullying others:
A. Turn off the computer
B. Journal/write the situation down on paper
C. Call a friend for emotional support
D. All of the above
E. None of the above

7.
What are some ways that digital evidence of cyberbullying can be collected and used to get an adult to discipline the bully?
A. Instant messaging logs
B. Screenshots taken of offending web pages
C. Tracing the identity of an email sender
D. Analyzing computer hard drives and flash memory cards in phones and cameras
E. All of the above

8.
Which of the following would be the most secure password for an online site?
A. "computer"
B. "cow"
C. "$trawb3rry"
D. "5555555555"
E. "football37"

9.
What should you do if you see someone else being cyberbullied?
A. Report it to an adult
B. Support the person who is being bullied
C. Stand up to the bully
D. Save any digital evidence (make screenshots, printouts, etc.)
E. All of the above

10.
Which of the following should you do if you are cyberbullied:
A. Think that it is your fault
B. Keep it to yourself
C. Try to resolve it yourself, and then tell an adult if you are unsuccessful
D. Skip school
E. Fight back

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What They're Saying...
I attended a Cyberbullying Conference at the University of Penn on April 27, 2010. Before arriving, my expectations were not that high as I anticipated hearing the same message that I have heard at other conferences on this issue, "The Internet is dangerous," "Protect your kids - limit their usage," "Don't let them use Facebook." However, within a few minutes of hearing Sameer speak, I was encouraged that the message he presented was going in a different direction. He was not trying to "taint" the Internet or discourage it's use. Rather, he promoted the importance of open dialog with our children and education on proper use. He highlighted the need for adults to be "safe havens" where children feel they can go when a problem does arise on the Internet, without the fear that they, as the victim, would be punished by losing their access to technology. He didn't only talk about cyberbullying as being a problem, but he offered solutions. Good, applicable guidelines that educators, parents and students alike could implement. I appreciate the work he is doing in this field and his willingness to share many resources -for free - with others. I left the conference with a renewed sense of hope in being able to offer valuable feedback and resources not only to the youth and families that I work with, but to my own family as well. Elizabeth J. T. Valdez, M.Ed., N.C.C., L.P.C., Student Assistance Program Consultant, Pennsylvania Counseling Services
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